The Right Strategy to Migrate Jira with Rachel Wright

“Spend 25% of your migration project auditing what you have, understanding your configuration and the apps you have installed, how much data do you need to migrate, and if you even need to migrate all the data. Upfront planning is the key to your success.”

Join Rachel Wright and Manuel Pattyn from iDalko, a Platinum Atlassian Solution Partner, as we discuss Jira migration. In this episode of iDalko Live, we cover how to plan your migration, handle Jira apps, choosing the right Jira Cloud plan for your needs, involving end users in the migration process, and more.

Listen in podcast format or read the written transcript on the iDalko website.

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Project Administration Links in Jira Software and Jira Service Management

If you have Jira Software and Jira Service Management, how do you know which project admin links are for Jira project settings and which are for service management features?

While both Jira Software and Jira Service Management settings work together to power support projects, it’s helpful to know which links are for which application type so you can consult the correct documentation and information.

Here’s a handy list and and some differences between links in the Cloud and Server deployment types.

Project Admin Area

To get to a project’s admin area click the “Project settings” link in any Service Management project. It’s at the bottom of a project’s left sidebar. In Jira Server, the link takes the admin to the “Request types” page by default. In Cloud, the link takes the admin to the “Details” page by default.

Service project admin in Server

In Server, the first set of sidebar settings are common to all Jira projects. Those links include: Summary, Details, Re-index project, and Delete project.

Further down the page are settings specific to Jira Service Management (JSM) projects. The first link in the section is labeled “Request types”.

The additional links below are for standard Jira project settings like issue types, workflows, screens, and more. You might also have additional links for managing third-party app settings.


Service project admin in Cloud

In Cloud, the Jira and JSM settings are ordered differently.  For example, the second section shows the Jira issue types and the JSM request types together.

Settings List

Here’s a handy list of the typical sidebar links and which application type they belong to.

Jira Software

The following settings are used by software-type projects:

  • Summary
  • Details
  • People (Cloud only)
  • Re-index project (Server only)
  • Delete project
  • Issue types
  • Workflows
  • Screens
  • Fields
  • Priorities
  • Versions
  • Components
  • Users and roles (Server only)
  • Permissions
  • Issue Security
  • Notifications
  • Project links
  • Development tools
  • Issue collectors

Jira Service Management

The following settings are used by service-type projects:

  • Change Management (Cloud only)
  • Request types
  • Customer permissions
  • Language support
  • Portal settings
  • Email requests
  • Customer notifications
  • Widget (Cloud only)
  • Satisfaction settings
  • Knowledge base
  • SLAs
  • Calendars
  • Automation
  • Apps (Cloud only)
  • Incident management (Server only)

Need help using or configuring Jira Software or Jira Service Management settings? Take my LinkedIn Learning courses to understand capabilities and best practices.

Rachel Wright’s Jira Courses on LinkedIn

Default Jira Notifications


Default notification scheme (Jira Software Cloud)

Sometimes it’s important to understand how far your Jira application has strayed from the default configuration. Was that setting there from the beginning or did an application administrator add it eons ago?

To find out, visit Admin > Issues > Notification schemes in your application. Then use this baseline list to compare your Jira settings to the default.

Initial settings for Jira Cloud and Jira Server/Data Center v8.15 are included below. I keep fresh and untouched application instances around so you don’t have to!

Jira Software Cloud, Server & Data Center Notifications

Issue Created (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Updated (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Assigned (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Resolved (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Closed (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Commented (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Comment Edited (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Comment Deleted (System)

Notifications:  none

Issue Reopened (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Deleted (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Moved (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Work Logged On Issue (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Work Started On Issue (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Work Stopped On Issue (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Worklog Updated (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Issue Worklog Deleted (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

Generic Event (System)

Notifications:

  • Current Assignee
  • Reporter
  • All Watchers

See also: Default Jira Global Permissions | Default Jira Project Permissions | Default Jira Notifications

Jira Migration Poll

Please complete the poll to tell us a little bit about your migration plans.

Are you migrating to a different deployment type, changing hosting environments, or merging applications?
Check all that apply

View results

Default Jira Global Permissions

Global Permissions (Jira Cloud)
Global Permissions (Jira Cloud)

Sometimes it’s important to understand how far your Jira application has strayed from the default configuration. Was that setting there from the beginning or did an application administrator add it eons ago?

To find out, visit Admin > System > Global permissions in your application. Then use this baseline list to compare your Jira settings to the default.

Initial settings for Jira Cloud and Jira Server/Data Center v8.15 are included below. I keep fresh and untouched application instances around so you don’t have to!

Jira Software Cloud Global Permissions

Administer Jira

Create and administer projects, issue types, fields, workflows, and schemes for all projects. Users with this permission can perform most administration tasks, except: managing users, importing data, and editing system email settings.

Users/Groups:

  • system-administrators
  • atlassian-addons-admin
  • site-admins
  • trusted-users-xxx (unique alphanumeric string)
  • administrators
  • jira-administrators

Browse users and groups

View and select users or groups from the user picker, and share issues. Users with this permission can see the names of all users and groups on your site.

Users/Groups:

  • system-administrators
  • site-admins
  • jira-software-users
  • administrators
  • jira-administrators
  • atlassian-addons-admin

Share dashboards and filters

Share dashboards and filters with other users.

Users/Groups:

  • atlassian-addons-admin
  • jira-software-users
  • system-administrators
  • jira-administrators
  • site-admins
  • administrators

Manage group filter subscriptions

Create and delete group filter subscriptions.

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators
  • jira-software-users
  • administrators
  • system-administrators
  • atlassian-addons-admin
  • site-admins

Make bulk changes

Modify collections of issues at once. For example, resolve multiple issues in one step.

Users/Groups:

  • atlassian-addons-admin
  • jira-software-users
  • site-admins
  • administrators
  • jira-administrators
  • system-administrators

Create next-gen projects

Create projects separate from shared configurations and schemes. Next-gen projects don’t affect existing projects or shared configurations like workflows, fields or permissions. Only licensed users can create next-gen projects.

Users/Groups:

  • Public, anyone on the internet, including logged in and anonymous users.

Jira Software Server & Data Center Global Permissions

Jira System Administrators

Ability to perform all administration functions. There must be at least one group with this permission.

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators

Jira Administrators

Ability to perform most administration functions (excluding Import & Export, SMTP Configuration, etc.).

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators

Browse Users

Ability to select a user or group from a popup window as well as the ability to use the ‘share’ issues feature. Users with this permission will also be able to see names of all users and groups in the system.

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators
  • jira-servicedesk-users (If installed)
  • jira-software-users

Create Shared Objects

Ability to share dashboards and filters with other users, groups and roles.

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators
  • jira-servicedesk-users (If installed)
  • jira-software-users

Manage Group Filter Subscriptions

Ability to manage (create and delete) group filter subscriptions.

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators
  • jira-servicedesk-users (If installed)
  • jira-software-users

Bulk Change

Ability to modify a collection of issues at once. For example, resolve multiple issues in one step.

Users/Groups:

  • jira-administrators
  • jira-servicedesk-users (If installed)
  • jira-software-users

Browse Archive

Ability to browse all archived issues.

Users/Groups:

  • None (empty)

See also: Default Jira Global Permissions | Default Jira Project Permissions | Default Jira Notifications

Thoughts on Atlassian’s Server Decommission

In October 2020, Atlassian announced they will stop selling new Server licenses on February 2, 2021. Further, they will end support for Server products on February 2, 2024. This means customers like me will need to
switch to Data Center, migrate to Atlassian-hosted Cloud products, or make alternate plans.

It’s no surprise that this announcement brought a mixed reaction from the user community. There was a lot of initial shock and emotion as the online forums erupted with commentary. It took me a while to process all the information and I’m finally ready to share my opinions.

Before I do, there’s something you should know. It’s no secret; I’ve been in a relationship with Jira since 2011.

I'm Currently in a Relationship with JIRA

But before I discovered Jira, I was in love with Salesforce. I fell in love with both applications for the same reasons: both were infinitely flexible and let me configure them exactly the way I wanted. I could adapt the software to fit my needs without changing my behavior.

A well-worn Salesforce conference giveaway

I attended a Salesforce user conference and brought home a giveaway that I still have today. This little mint container displays Salesforce’s trademark “no software” logo. At first I didn’t understand. How could a software company be anti-software? The logo conveys that Salesforce said “no” to the familiar concept of hosted software and “yes” to cloud infrastructure instead. I acquired this item sometime around 2005. So ~15 years later, the fact that the software industry has pivoted to leverage the cloud is not a huge surprise. Cloud proponents might ask why Atlassian took so long to make their announcement! Don’t get me wrong, I’m a HUGE Jira Server fan and I will always love and prefer it. But asking Atlassian to develop and support multiple deployment methods, with different code bases, features, and terminology is a terrible long term business plan.

Cloud is Inevitable

This announcement was ultimately inevitable but it doesn’t mean it will be an easy road for everyone. There are certainly organizations with a real or a perceived aversion to cloud software. Some industries have complex governance and compliance regulations to consider and there are data residency concerns and latency issues to resolve. There are consultants facing real challenges with helping their clients through this transition. There are Jira Server administrators wondering if moving to Cloud means their role is unnecessary or redundant. (Not at all! Cloud applications need competent administrators to manage and maintain the configuration. There are just a few things you won’t need to do anymore. Example: a manual re-index.)

Some Options

For customers who can afford it, switching from Server to Data Center can be as easy as simply pasting in an updated license key and installing Data Center compatible apps, assuming they exist. Jira Data Center has some attractive features, like clustering (multiple applications), archival, high availability, redundancy, disaster recovery, etc, but you don’t have to use them. You can simply run Data Center as non-clustered (single) application.

For customers who are open to migrating to Cloud-hosted products, there are cost, feature, app, and user interface differences to consider. Migration is not a simple weekend project, but with adequate analysis, planning, and testing, it is doable.

I have to give Atlassian credit for announcing this change years in advance. At the very least, we all have adequate time to prepare or make alternate plans. They have visibly invested in their Cloud infrastructure and there’s still a lot of time before “end of life” to address the outstanding concerns. Atlassian has provided migration information, created a new Cloud tool to help move data, and publicly addressed our gripes – although I understand that not all will be satisfied with the responses. Some customers feel forgotten, disrespected, or excluded. I can understand that perspective and don’t intend to disregard or minimize those feelings.

Pricing Concerns

Many of us are concerned with price increases. The Data Center cost is simply out of reach for some organizations. As a consultant, I keep a Jira Server instance running simply to take screenshots, create training materials, and support my clients using Server. This is a test instance and I am the only user. My annual starter license cost is $10 USD. If I understand correctly, to simply change to a Data Center license, my annual cost increases to over $20,000 USD. This is simply impossible and unreasonable. If true, it means small consultancies like mine can’t properly support Data Center clients in the future. It’s crazy to think that I can’t afford the software I love so much and help others manage! I’ll have to try to keep my sandbox Jira Server instance running as long as possible or until it’s no longer useful for its intended purpose. For charitable and non-profit organizations, I’m happy to see that free Data Center licenses are now available.

Change is Constant

Change is hard. I understand and sympathize. But change is also constant in this world. The only thing you can control is how you react to change. I’m trying to improve the way I personally respond and in this situation, I’m choosing to find ways to see this as a positive opportunity. For example, I have the ability to help organizations determine the best path for their unique needs. I can help companies reduce risk during their migrations. And I can learn to love Jira Cloud as much as Server – or at least try.

If you plan to change to Jira Data Center, migrate to Jira Cloud, have multiple Jira Server applications to consolidate, or simply feel lost about what to do next, there’s a new resource just for you! I teamed up with Atlassian Solution Partner Botron Atlassian Apps to create The Ultimate Guide to Jira Migrations: How to migrate from Jira Server to Data Center or Cloud. This free 180 page ebook is the master resource to answer all your migration questions and provide a comprehensive plan to follow.

Regardless of your situation, take a deep breath, and try to work towards arriving at the “acceptance” stage of this announcement. You’ve likely survived bigger software challenges and I have no doubt you will get through this one as well. Until then, I wish you the very best of luck, success, and prosperity in the new year.

Announcing The Ultimate Guide to Jira Migrations

Software migrations are fact of life and Jira is no different. No solution fits forever and organizations must pivot as needs and industry capabilities change. As systems evolve, features grow, and infrastructure becomes obsolete migrations and consolidations are inevitable.

In October 2020, Atlassian announced they will stop selling new licenses of their Server products. Customers need to switch to Data Center, migrate to Atlassian-hosted Cloud products, or make alternate plans by Feb 2, 2024. What should you do if you have Jira Server or multiple Jira applications? There’s a lot of great migration information available, but until now, it was all scattered in different locations.

That’s why I teamed up with Atlassian Solution Partner Botron Atlassian Apps to create The Ultimate Guide to Jira Migrations: How to migrate from Jira Server to Data Center or Cloud.

This 180 page book is the master resource to answer all your migration questions and provide a comprehensive plan to follow.

This book includes:

  • best practices for planning a migration or merge,
  • practical tips for preparation, execution, and testing,
  • a 73 step checklist so you don’t miss anything before, during, or after
  • 16 customizable worksheets for planning, analysis, and project management,
  • a quiz for determining the best deployment method for your situation,
  • and expert advice.

Download your FREE comprehensive Jira migration, merge, and consolidation guide from the Botron website.

Learning Jira Server

My new Learning Jira Server course is available now! Use Jira Cloud instead?

By learning Jira you’ll be able to easily manage your own daily tasks and help your organization plan their strategic initiatives. In this course, you’ll learn all about navigating Jira, working with projects and issues, and creating filters, dashboards, and boards.  I’ll show you everything you need to know so you can get started right away.

Take my Jira course on LinkedIn. Access is included with your Premium subscription! Not a member yet? Start your 30 day LinkedIn Learning free trial

Rachel Wright’s Jira Courses on LinkedIn

Jira Server vs Jira Cloud Interface Comparison

Are you migrating from Jira Server to Jira Cloud (or vice versa)? The user interfaces are similar, but there are some differences to prepare for.

In early 2020 Atlassian started incrementally delivering a new navigation experience for Jira Cloud. The return of the horizontal navigation makes the application look similar to Server, but there are still UI differences to be aware of.

Continue reading “Jira Server vs Jira Cloud Interface Comparison”

Which type of Jira do I have?

When I started using Jira in 2011 there was only one type. But now there are different application types, like Jira Work Management (formerly Jira Core), Jira Software, and Jira Service Management (formerly Jira Service Desk), and different deployment types, like Jira Cloud, Jira Server, and Jira Data Center. If you have Jira Cloud, there are also different plans like Free, Standard, Premium, and Enterprise. How do you know which you have? Why does it matter?

Continue reading “Which type of Jira do I have?”